The nature of flow and sediment movement in Little Granite Creek near Bondurant, Wyoming
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The nature of flow and sediment movement in Little Granite Creek near Bondurant, Wyoming

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station in Ogden, Utah .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Bed load -- Wyoming -- Little Granite Creek,
  • Sediment transport -- Wyoming -- Little Granite Creek,
  • Erosion -- Wyoming -- Little Granite Creek

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementSandra E. Ryan, William W. Emmett
SeriesGeneral technical report RMRS -- GTR-90
ContributionsEmmett, William W, Rocky Mountain Research Station (Fort Collins, Colo.)
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination48 p.
Number of Pages48
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13630503M
OCLC/WorldCa50487942

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Get this from a library! The nature of flow and sediment movement in Little Granite Creek near Bondurant, Wyoming. [Sandra E Ryan; William W Emmett; Rocky Mountain Research Station (Fort Collins, Colo.)]. The Nature of Flow and Sediment Movement in Little Granite Creek. by Sandra Ryan and William Emmett. A relatively long-term database of more than measurements of sediment transport has been acquired through the combined efforts of the USDA Forest Service and the U.S. Geological Survey at Little Granite Creek, a gravel-bed stream draining a. Sediment and flow measurements were made during the course of 13 runoff seasons between and near the confluence of Little Granite Creek with Granite Creek (Fig. 1, site 3). Flows were measured at a USGS gaging station (USGS, a Cited by: Sediment and flow measurements were made during the course of 13 runoff seasons between and on a gravel-bed stream near Bondurant, Wyoming. The data for Little Granite Creek, compiled.

Little Granite Creek drains a km 2 area near the site of a former USGS gauging station () that was active between and The sediment sampling program at this site began in as part of environmental monitoring in conjunction with planned exploration and extraction of fossil fuels in the upper by: The nature of flow and sediment movement in Little Granite Creek near Bondurant, Wyoming / Sandra E. Ryan, William W. Emmett. Ogden, UT: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, [] SDA14 G no   Troendle CA, Nankervis JM, Ryan SE () Sediment transport from small, steep-gradient watersheds in Colorado and Wyoming. In: Sixth federal interagency sedimentation conference on sedimentation technologies for management of natural resources in the 21st century, March 10–14, , Las Vegas, NV, pp IX–IX Google ScholarCited by: 5. The nature of flow and sediment movement in Little Granite Creek near Bondurant, Wyoming / (Ogden, UT: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, []), also by Sandra E. Ryan and William W. Emmett (page images at HathiTrust).

1 Introduction [2] Sediment supply is a fundamental boundary condition controlling river channel dynamics. In a very broad sense, channel patterns and properties evolve downstream through a series of morphologic transitions, which are frequently described as basin‐scale responses to variations in water and sediment supply [Schumm, ; Montgomery and Buffington, ; Cited by:   We measured channel morphology and sediment characteristics on nine braided reaches and 10 single‐thread reaches in six streams: Sunlight Creek, South Fork Shoshone River, Pacific Creek, Pilgrim Creek, Spread Creek, and the Snake River above Jackson Lake (Figure 1 and Table 2). For the latter five sites, we surveyed channel geometry and Cited by: 3. Study Sites and Methods [16] Data obtained by King et al. [] from 24 mountain gravel bed rivers in central Idaho were used to assess the performance of different bed load transport equations and to develop our proposed power function for bed load transport ().The 24 study sites are single‐thread channels with pool‐riffle or plane‐bed morphology (as defined by . Pass at the head of Granite Creek and to west of Liberty Bell. Black Peak is the main summit in this granitic body. On the west these rocks have apparent­ ly formed from Skagit gneiss, just as the Chilliwack rocks have on the oppo­ site side of the gneiss region. The ori­ ginal eastern contact of the Black Peak granodiorite and quartz.