shared vision of Waldo Frank and Hart Crane
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shared vision of Waldo Frank and Hart Crane by Perry, Robert L.

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Published by University [of Nebraska] in Lincoln .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Crane, Hart, 1899-1932 -- Criticism and interpretation.,
  • Frank, Waldo David, 1889- -- Criticism and interpretation.,
  • American literature -- 20th century -- History and criticism.,
  • National characteristics, American, in literature.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 72-73.

Statement[by] Robert L. Perry.
SeriesUniversity of Nebraska studies, new ser., no. 33
Classifications
LC ClassificationsAS36 .N2 n.s., no. 33
The Physical Object
Pagination73 p.
Number of Pages73
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6010485M
LC Control Number66064842

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Harold Hart Crane (J – Ap ) was an American poet. Finding both inspiration and provocation in the poetry of T. S. Eliot, Crane wrote modernist poetry that was difficult, highly stylized, and ambitious in its his most ambitious work, The Bridge, Crane sought to write an epic poem, in the vein of The Waste Land, that expressed a more optimistic view of modern Literary movement: Modernism. I got absolutely nothing out of Hart Crane's "The Bridge." Though it was a short book, it took me awhile to finish because it was so boring, obscure, and over-written. There were points where I wondered if Crane was engaging in parody, because the style was so over-the-top, rather like that of a nineteenth-century orator, but no, it seems he /5. The shared vision of Waldo Frank and Hart Crane by Robert L Perry (Book) Waldo Frank; a study by Gorham Bert Munson (Book) Waldo Frank in America Hispana by Hispanic Institute in the United States (Book). Crane, Hart (21 July –27 April ), poet, was born Harold Hart Crane in Garrettsville, Ohio, the son of Clarence Arthur Crane, a wealthy candy manufacturer and retailer, and Grace Cranes’ marriage was troubled, ending in divorce in , and Hart Crane, an only child whose formal education ended in high school, became a pawn in their turbulent relationship.

The first book, The Correspondence between Hart Crane and Waldo Frank was published in the Spring of after a long and consuming battle over permissions to reproduce all of Crane’s letters to the Jewish social philosopher and novelist Waldo Frank. The third book, The Correspondence between Hart Crane and Allen Tate, is based on. Frank, Waldo, [ Book: ] View online (access conditions) At 5 libraries. This resource is very relevant to your query (score: 91,) The collected poems of Hart Crane / edited with an introduction by Waldo Frank The shared vision of Waldo Frank and Hart Crane / . Full text of "Letters of Hart Crane, " See other formats. Toomer's book reveals his vision of the mixture of good and evil which con-4 The Letters of Hart Crane, ed. Brom Weber (New York: Hermitage House, ), p. 5 See Robert L. Perry, The Shared Vision of Waldo Frank and Hart Crane (Lincoln: University of Nebraska, ), University of Nebraska Studies ; .

6 John Unterecker, Voyager - A Life of Hart Crane (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, ), p. 7 Robert L. Perry, " The Shared Vision of Waldo Frank and Hart Crane," University of Nebraska Series, 33 (May, ), Harold Hart Crane (J – Ap ) was an American poet. Finding both inspiration and provocation in the poetry of T. S. Eliot, Crane wrote modernist poetry that was difficult, highly stylized, and ambitious in its his most ambitious work, The Bridge, Crane sought to write an epic poem, in the vein of The Waste Land, that expressed a more optimistic view of modern.   Walker Evans's photographs of Brooklyn Bridge emphasized the lyric intimacy at the core of Hart Crane’s work by inviting the reader to look closely at the bridge from unconventional points of view. In one photograph, taken directly underneath the bridge, Evans’s lens, pointed up, turns the horizontal structure into a thrusting vertical funnel, soaring and expanding out of the frame. EPLYING to Waldo Frank in late February , about Frank's and Munson's evidently perceptive wand laudatory comments on "Faustus and Helen," Crane was moved to say: I am certain that a number of us at last have some kind of community of interest. And with this communion will come something better than a mere clique. It is a con­Cited by: 3.